The Cure

By Simon Parker

I’m pretty sure that The Cure Saved my life. Not in a “jump in the river and pull me out” type of way but more because they offered me an alternative mind set to the crushingly conservative and predictable 1980’s teenage life I found myself living in West Sussex. Courtesy of the local charity shops, The Cure changed my image but they also changed my outlook. Suddenly it was more than OK to be slightly ridiculous and not in-step with other people. Being yourself was the most important thing and if society didn’t like this then that was just fine with me. I finally found a voice, and a wardrobe which included a pair of Converse sneakers and a second hand black suit that was at least three sizes too big for me, and don’t forget the fluorescent socks! Very important were those garish socks because they were a feature of The Cure’s 1985 “Head On The Door” album. A definitive Cure classic, and their first true “pop” album, although the band’s version of pop was devised of skewed and jumbled styles, no two songs sounded the same and yet it was all undeniably the work of one fiercely individual group who just happened to come from Crawley, not that far from my own home town of Chichester. If it’s in print, Vinyl Revolution will always stock “The Head On The Door” because it meant (and still means) so much to me. Without this LP (named after a recurring dream of singer Robert Smith) I would never have found the courage to set off on my own musical adventure. And I guess that means there would be no Vinyl Revolution. For those thinking of exploring The Cure’s extensive back catalogue (do it!), may I humbly recommend you begin with “Disintegration”, “Seventeen Seconds”, “Bloodflowers” and the “Standing On A Beach” singles compilation. And of course “The Head On The Door”. Who knows? Maybe it will save your life too.